A Soundies Conversation at the Academy Museum in L.A.

 

I’m honored to be part of the Regeneration Summit, a celebration of Black cinema coming to the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles this weekend.

I’ll be speaking on the panel “Soundies 101: A Hidden History,” talking about the films, performers, and cultural history that I wrote about in the book.

I’ll be in conversation with artist and media conservation specialist Ina Archer, who did several of the intros for the upcoming Kino Lorber Soundies collection (see the post just below this one); archivist and jazz-on-film scholar Mark Cantor, who was so vital to the book; film researcher Manouchka Labouba; and our moderator Doris Berger, co-curator of the museum’s milestone exhibition “Regeneration: Black Cinema 1898-1971.”

The panel is at 1 p.m. on Saturday, February 4, followed by a meet-and-greet in the museum bookstore at 2.

If you’re in the LA area, I’d love to see you there.

Sneak Preview: Shooting the Intros for a New Soundies Collection

 

Ina Archer and Susan Delson in the Library of Congress theater in Culpeper, VA

Last week I was at the Library of Congress Audio-Visual Conservation Center in Virginia with Ina Archer, an artist and media conservation specialist at the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

This spring, Kino Lorber will release a collection of Soundies that I curated—24 programs worth. Ina and I were in the LC’s gorgeous Packard Campus Theater to shoot some of the on-camera intros.

We had a blast talking Soundies—everything from Paddy Callahan Has Joined the Army to Emily Brown.

Thanks to everyone at the LC, especially Rob Stone and David, the theater projectionist. And to our indefatigable crew, production manager Heather Buckley and DP Eric Thirteen.

More news about the Kino Lorber Soundies package to come.

Soundies Book Is An Outstanding Academic Title of 2022

 

Trust a librarian to know good books! And the librarians of Choice, the American Library Association magazine, have named Soundies and the Changing Image of Black Americans on Screen: One Dime at a Time an Outstanding Academic Title of 2022.

Books on the list are chosen for their “excellence in scholarship and presentation, the significance of their contribution to the field, and their value as an important—often the first—treatment of their subject.” 

According to the ALA Choice website, “The list is quite selective: it contains approximately ten percent of some 5,000 works reviewed in Choice each year.” 

Librarians: If you’re adding the book to your collection,  I’d love to hear about it. And thank you.